Salesforce Gets a Dose of Oracle Discipline


The cloud pioneer wants customers to stop buying piecemeal

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.bloomberg.com

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The Square Kilometre Array: radio silence in Western Australia for most powerful telescope in history


On a former cattle farm in the remote outback, scientists are laying the ground for the biggest science project of the next 20 years: a radio telescope capable of picking out something like an airport radar on a planet in another solar system. Turn on your phone at your peril, because preserving radio quiet here is priority number one

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.theguardian.com

The telescope will be perhaps 10,000 times more powerful than any we currently have, and we will need a supercomputer more advanced than anything yet built to analyse the data it produces. Right now we can spot planets circling around distant stars. The SKA will be able to spot the equivalent of an airport radar system on one of those very, very distant planets.

 

It will also allow us to dig down into the ancient history of our universe, and there’s no knowing what it will find there, or what it will mean for us.

 

On SKA’s website, there is a list of five things the telescope will look into, but as Dr John Morgan, a tall, cheerful astronomer from Curtin University, puts it: “You can guarantee that the thing that SKA will be remembered for – is not on that list. It’s going to be the thing you have not thought of. It’s the unknown unknown.”

The thing that SKA will be remembered for … is going to be the thing you have not thought of

Dr John Morgan

See on Scoop.itten Hagen on Social Media


The Square Kilometre Array: radio silence in Western Australia for most powerful telescope in history


On a former cattle farm in the remote outback, scientists are laying the ground for the biggest science project of the next 20 years: a radio telescope capable of picking out something like an airport radar on a planet in another solar system. Turn on your phone at your peril, because preserving radio quiet here is priority number one

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.theguardian.com

The telescope will be perhaps 10,000 times more powerful than any we currently have, and we will need a supercomputer more advanced than anything yet built to analyse the data it produces. Right now we can spot planets circling around distant stars. The SKA will be able to spot the equivalent of an airport radar system on one of those very, very distant planets.

 

It will also allow us to dig down into the ancient history of our universe, and there’s no knowing what it will find there, or what it will mean for us.

 

On SKA’s website, there is a list of five things the telescope will look into, but as Dr John Morgan, a tall, cheerful astronomer from Curtin University, puts it: “You can guarantee that the thing that SKA will be remembered for – is not on that list. It’s going to be the thing you have not thought of. It’s the unknown unknown.”

The thing that SKA will be remembered for … is going to be the thing you have not thought of

Dr John Morgan

See on Scoop.itten Hagen on Social Media


Why Marketers Should Care About Snapchat


Not using Snapchat for your marketing yet? Here’s why you may want to consider it.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.inc.com

Snapchat has evolved from a solely photo-sharing platform to a content consumption platform with an increased focus on marketing and advertising. But exactly how large is the Snapchat audience? Compared to popular photo sharing platforms Snapchat, Whatsapp, Facebook, Instagram, and Flickr on the basis of number of photos shared per day, the current number of users, the age of each company, and photos shared per second, Snapchat came out on top despite being the youngest company (Photoworld). This data reveals that Snapchat’s 200 million and growing users share 8,796 photos per second–even more than WhatsApp, even though in comparison it is a much larger network.

See on Scoop.itten Hagen on Social Media


Twitter’s new ‘Personas’ let brands easily target millenials, baby boomers and more


Twitter unveiled Audience Insights back in May to help brands get a better grasp of the people they reach on the platform. Now the company is upgrading Insights with new demographic data, buying behavior and more.

First up, Twitter is introducing something they call ‘personas,’ which are basically quick ways to categorize audiences based on similar attributes. Some of these include ‘millenials,’ ‘baby boomers,’ and ‘business decision-makers.’

Sourced through Scoop.it from: thenextweb.com

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Bill Gates Announces ‘Remote Controlled’ Implantable Birth Control Chip Lasting 16 Years


Bill Gates, of Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has announced a remote controlled implantable birth control chip that could last up to 16 years. Robert Langer, a professor from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is helping the foundation in this endeavor.

Langer connected the Gate’s Foundation with MicroCHIPS, a Massachusetts firm licensed to use a controlled-release microchip technology. The partnership between Langer and Gates has been busy with developing the technology. The chips will be ready for sale in market in the early 2018, with safety tests starting by the end of this year.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: fossbytes.com

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Greek Default, Fed Rate Hike: Sell The Rumor, Buy The News


Greece is a country that peaked around 400 B.C. and is of no economic importance, even to Europe, much less the world.  On top of which, Greece has already defaulted more than five years ago.  Neither the word “default” nor the word “bankrupt” have the slightest bit of meaning if they can be neutered merely by someone providing more loans to repay the existing ones.  Indeed, a recognized Greek default might even have the salutary effect of alerting governments of the need to tailor fiscal policies so that spending and revenues bear some relationship to each other.  If European—and U.S. and Japanese– governments could learn THAT, a Greek default should qualify for the Nobel Prize for Economics.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.valuewalk.com

Greece is a country that peaked around 400 B.C. and is of no economic importance, even to Europe, much less the world.  On top of which, Greece has already defaulted more than five years ago.  Neither the word “default” nor the word “bankrupt” have the slightest bit of meaning if they can be neutered merely by someone providing more loans to repay the existing ones.  Indeed, a recognized Greek default might even have the salutary effect of alerting governments of the need to tailor fiscal policies so that spending and revenues bear some relationship to each other.  If European—and U.S. and Japanese– governments could learn THAT, a Greek default should qualify for the Nobel Prize for Economics.

See on Scoop.itten Hagen on Social Media


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